The Technology is Here, the Time is Now: Expanding Biological Measurements on GO-SHIP

The Technology is Here, the Time is Now: Expanding Biological Measurements on GO-SHIP A new report from SCOR WG 154 (P-OBS) The oceanographic community has made great strides over the past couple of decades in developing physical and biogeochemical observing capacity. However, a more holistic understanding of marine ecosystem function and change requires large-scale and […]

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New Working Group: Filling the gaps in observation-based estimates of air–sea carbon fluxes

The goal of this working group will be to assess critical uncertainties in existing observation-based products, determine how best to integrate observation-based open-ocean and coastal-ocean CO2 air–sea fluxes, and quantify uncertainties in the natural (pre-industrial) outgassing of CO2. The first meeting of this working group will take place May 5-6, 2020 at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. […]

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OCB BioGeoSCAPES Scoping Workshop

Laying the foundation for a potential future BioGeoSCAPES program: Assessing needs and capabilities for studying controls on ocean metabolism through integrated omics and biogeochemistry PIs: Ben Twining, Mak Saito, Alyson Santoro, Adrian Marchetti, Naomi Levine Dates/Venue: October 14-17, 2020 (Woods Hole, MA). Registration to open May 2020 Learn more

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OCB 2020 Summer Workshop

The OCB 2020 Summer Workshop will be held June 22-25 in Woods Hole, MA. Registration will open April 2020. Announcing the OCB2020 plenary topics: BioGeoSCAPES (Chairs: Dreux Chappell, Patrick Rafter, Adam Martiny), *also note BioGeoSCAPES scoping workshop in Oct. 2020 Ocean optics (Chairs: Amy Maas, Maria Tzortziou) Ocean-based negative emissions technologies (Chairs: Lennart Bach, Clare […]

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Krillin’ it with poop: Highlighting the importance of Antarctic krill in ocean carbon and nutrient cycling

Scientists have long known the role of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) in Southern Ocean ecosystems. Evidence is gathering about krill’s biogeochemical importance through releasing millions of faecal pellets in swarms and stimulating primary production through nutrient excretion. Here, we explore and synthesise the known impacts that this highly abundant and rather large species has on […]

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Diatoms commit iron piracy with stolen bacterial gene

Since diatoms carry out much of the primary production in iron-limited marine environments, constraining the details of how these phytoplankton acquire the iron they need is paramount to our understanding of biogeochemical cycles of iron-depleted high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The proteins involved in this process are largely unknown, but McQuaid et al. (2018) scientists described […]

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Ocean Fertilization informational website

OCB’s redesigned Ocean Fertilization website is available at https://web.whoi.edu/ocb-fert/. This website is designed for both non-scientists and scientists as an information clearinghouse for research, policy, media, literature and resources related to iron addition to the ocean. Also see The danger of creating a designer planet by Ken Buesseler (WHOI), The Economist blog post  

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A New Approach to Chemical Speciation Modeling – Join us for a Test Drive at Ocean Sciences 2020

Salinity-based equilibrium constants are widely used to estimate trace element speciation and solve the marine carbonate system. However, this approach is necessarily limited to solutions with seawater stoichiometry. As part of SCOR Working Group 145 and a collaborative NERC/NSF-funded project, we have been developing models that use thermodynamic equilibrium constants, together with activity coefficients, taking […]

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